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MAT 116 COMPLETE CLASS

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  • danny
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Question Description

MAT 116 COMPLETE CLASS

MAT 116 FINAL EXAM

Week 2:

Exercise: Week Two Concept Check

  • Post your 50-word response to the following:
  • How do you know when an equation has infinitely many solutions?
  • How do you know when an equation has no solution?

Assignment: Expressions and Equations

  • Complete Appendix C to apply the skills learned in Ch. 1 and sections 2.1–2.6 of Ch. 2 to a real-life situation.
  • Use Equation Editor® to write mathematical equations and expressions in Appendix C.

 

Week 4:

Exercise: Week Four Concept Check

  • Post your 50-word response to the following: Explain in your own words why the line x = 4 is a vertical line.

Assignment: Solving Inequalities and Graphing Equations

  • Complete Appendix D to apply skills learned in Ch. 2 & 3 to a real-life situation.
  • Use Equation Editor® to write mathematical equations and expression in Appendix D.

 

Week 6:

Exercise: Week Six Concept Check

  • Post your 50-word response to the following: How can you determine if two lines are perpendicular?

Assignment: Functions and Their Graphs

  • Complete Appendix E to apply the skills learned in Ch. 7 to a real-life situation.
  • Use Equation Editor® to write mathematical expressions and equations in Appendix E.

 

Week 8:

Exercise: Week Eight Concept Check

  • Post your response to the following: Describe what the graph of interval [-4,10] looks like.

Assignment: Systems of Equations and Inequalities

  • Complete Appendix F to apply the skills learned in Ch. 8 (8.1–8.4) & 9 (9.1, 9.2, & 9.4).
  • Use Equation Editor® to write mathematical equations and expressions in Appendix F.

 

Week 9:

Capstone Discussion Questions

Post your response to the following: Has the content in this course allowed you to think of math as a useful tool? If so, how? What concepts investigated in this course can apply to your personal and professional life? In what ways did you use MyMathLab® for extra support?

Discussion Questions:

Week 1:

  • What is the difference between an equation and an expression? Include an example of each. Can you solve for a variable in an expression? Explain your answer. Can you solve for a variable in an equation? Explain your answer. Write a mathematical phrase or sentence for your classmates to translate. Translate your classmates’ phrases or sentences and explain what clues indicate that the problems are either expressions or equations.

Respond to classmates who have responded to your sentence or phrase and indicate whether or not they correctly translated the problem. Ask clarifying questions if you need more explanation, or help students who seem to struggle with the concept.

  • What are the steps of the order of operations? Why is it important that you follow the steps rather than solve the problem from left to right?

Write an expression for your classmates to simplify using at least three of the following: (a) Groupings (parenthesis, brackets, or braces), (b) Exponents, (c) Multiplication or division, and (d) Addition or subtraction.

Consider participating in the discussion by simplifying a classmate’s expression, showing how the expression would be incorrectly simplified if computed from left to right, or challenging the class with a complicated expression. Respond to your initial post and provide your classmates with the answer to your expression.

 

Week 3:

  • Why does the inequality sign change when both sides are multiplied or divided by a negative number? Does this happen with equations? Why or why not?

Write an inequality for your classmates to solve. In your inequality, use both the multiplication and addition properties of inequalities.

Consider solving your classmates’ inequalities. Explain how you arrived at your answers. Also, help other students who may be having difficulty solving inequalities. Ask clarifying questions if you need additional assistance.

  • How do you know if a value is a solution for an inequality? How is this different from determining if a value is a solution to an equation?

If you replace the equal sign of an equation with an inequality sign, is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution to both the equation and the inequality?

Write an inequality and provide a value that may or may not be a solution to the inequality.

Consider responding to a classmate by determining whether or not the solution provided is a solution to the inequality. If the value he or she provides is a solution, provide a value that is not a solution. If the value is not a solution, provide a value that is a solution.

 

Week 5:

  • Address the following:

What similarities and differences do you see between functions and linear equations studied in Ch. 3?

Are all linear equations functions? Is there an instance when a linear equation is not a function? Support your answer.

Create an equation of a nonlinear function and provide two inputs for your classmates to evaluate.

Find examples that support or refute your classmates’ answers to the discussion question. Provide additional similarities and differences between functions and linear equations.

Challenge your classmates by providing more intricate examples of nonlinear functions for them to solve.

  • Address the following:

What is the difference between domain and range? Describe a real-life situation that could be modeled by a function.

Provide feedback about your classmates’ answers.

Describe the values for that may not be appropriate values even when they are defined by your classmates’ function. A function could, for example, indicate the amount of bone strength (y) in a living human body over time in years (x). It would not make sense to look at negative years, because the person would not yet be born. Likewise, looking beyond 100 years might not make sense, as many people do not live to be 100.

 

Week 7:

  • Address the following:

Systems of equations can be solved by graphing or by using substitution or elimination. What are the pros and cons of each method? Which method do you like best? Why?

What circumstances would cause you to use a different method?

Consider responding to your classmates by indicating pros and cons they may not have considered or persuading them to see the value of the method you like best (if you chose different methods). Describe situations in which you might use their methods of solving.

  • Address the following:

Review examples 2, 3, and 4 in section 8.4 of the text. How does the author determine what the first equation should be? What about the second equation? How are these examples similar? How are they different?

Find a problem in the text that is similar to examples 2, 3, and 4. Post the problem for your classmates to solve.

Consider responding to your classmates by asking clarifying questions or by expanding a classmate’s response. Also, help students solve the problem you posted by providing feedback or hints if necessary. You may also want to provide an explanation for your solution after a sufficient number of students have replied.

 


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$ 25
MAT 116 COMPLETE CLASS

Answer Posted By

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  • Amanda kelly
  • Questions : 85
  • Solutions : 466
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